Supporting Creativity Through Interactive Notebooks

The Stanford Creativity: Music to my Ears online class has me thinking a lot about creativity. One big take-away is that creativity is something that takes practice. When someone says, “I’m just not creative” it means that they have not practiced being creative enough to feel confident about it.

When this describes whole organization it’s truly a problem. In an article titled Working Creativity, by Mark Batey a case is made for creativity at the heart of the skill sets needed for the future.

As a teacher creativity is a skill that I try to bring out in my students. One strategy that has really made a difference for me is the use of interactive notebooks. Right now students are using them to write research papers and I am really excited about how well they keep everyone focused and moving along. I’ve designated each page of the notebook to be one baby step in the process and tried to encourage students to both be creative and to follow directions.

I’ll be posting photos from our unit, but first I thought I would share a few resources that I’ve been stalking for inspiration…

Dawn Miller at IBTEACHINU Language Arts

Randy Seldomridge at The Middle School Mouth

Katie at Following my Heart to First Grade

 at New Teacher Resources

If you have others website to suggest or ideas for how to develop creativity through interactive notebooks I’d love to hear about them –  please pass them on!

 

 

 

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Friday Reflection – the classroom library

What a long week it has been. I am waiting for my son to finish cross-country practice and taking a few minutes to reflect on the first two weeks of school. It’s nice to just catch my breath…

Three weeks ago I was given the opportunity to move from social studies to language arts. I loved what I taught, but this is truly an opportunity to “do what I always wanted to do when I grow-up.” Bonus – I get to it with an amazing team of co-teachers and a very supportive administration. I actually left an in-service asking another teacher if it was possible that our jobs could get better? I am that kind of happy!

All summer I have been hanging out in twitter world with the English teachers, the librarians,  and the authors. I instantly had ideas for what, why, and how I was going to tackle the world of English teacher. 40 book challenge… writer’s workshop… mini lessons… I was motivated!

Reality – after two weeks – I’m tired. 8th hour on Friday and I realize I’ve forgotten to eat anything since breakfast.

I’ve spent hours talking with students and parents about expectations and ideas. We will do the work of writers and we will try to become independent, veracious readers. I am working to establish the culture of passionate learning and stay one step ahead of the kids.

“No, you can’t turn that in yet… we are going to learn how to revise. That’s what real writer do.”

“Yes, I know it’s hard to write a poem, but we are going to give it a try.”

“Yes, I do have ideas for books you can read even if you have not read one since second grade.”

The students leave interested, wondering, tired – a lot like me.

Then a knock on the door brings a visitor with a box full of books. Books for my new library. Books for the new English teacher. Books to sort. Books I have not read. Books I read and loved. Books already being checked-out by my son who has wondered in.

And suddenly, I am not so tired after all…